Posts Tagged ‘Washington’

Stranger in a Strange Land

Stranger in a Strange Land is a 1961 science fiction novel by American author Robert A. Heinlein.  I have borrowed his title as a lead in to reporting on my experiences of moving to Washington, DC, and paying much more attention to how the US government operates, including its role in the economy and society […]

Washington Drama

I moved to Washington, DC a bit over four months ago.  I have long liked the city, traveling here at least once a month for business over almost four decades. During this transition, I started watching TV shows associated with the White House.  I have been binge watching The West Wing – just into the […]

Beyond the Affordable Care Act

What are we trying to do by rethinking the ACA?  Perhaps we are seeking an ideologically acceptable ACA, one that the Republicans get credit for rather than the Democrats.   On the other hand, is insurance coverage really the ultimate goal?  I don’t think so.  We want a healthy and educated population that is competitive in […]

The Quartet

In “The Quartet: Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, 1783-1789,” Joseph J. Ellis chronicles the planning, drafting, and ratification of the US Constitution and Bill of Rights in 1789.  The title refers to George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay and James Madison.  These four men, with support from Robert Morris, Gouverneur Morris and Thomas Jefferson, led […]

The New Reality

Our operatives have uncovered the motivation and reasoning behind various presidential candidates now emphasizing what many of them are calling the “new realty.”  This reality relates to their personal histories, climate change, economic prospects, and so on.  All of the candidates have “repositioned” their personal stories to gain voter support. One candidate, born to immense […]

Thoughts on Location

Does location matter?  It depends on what you are seeking.  If economic opportunity is your yardstick, here are some interesting statistics. Greater New York City generated $1.5 trillion in GDP for 2014.  Greater Los Angeles provided $0.8 trillion; greater Chicago $0.6 trillion; greater Houston and greater Washington, DC $0.5 trillion each; and greater Dallas, San […]

The Economics of Retirement

My last post addressed my frustration with a 60% taxation rate that left me wondering if my role was mainly to provide resources to be redistributed to other, undoubtedly needy, people who do not pay taxes.  The 40% that I get to spend barely covers my financial commitments.  So, how do I ever get ahead […]

Income Taxes

Over the past three years, my tax rate has increased to over 60% of my income.  This includes Federal and State Income Taxes, Social Security Taxes, Workmen’s Compensation, Medicare Tax, Sales Tax, and Property Taxes.  This tax rate, combined with the costs of living in an area where I earn a high enough income to […]

Five Million Jobs

A few years ago, I co-chaired the National Academies Healthy America Initiative.  The members of this committee came from both the Institute of Medicine and the National Academy of Engineering.  Our assignment was to wrestle with issues surrounding the effectiveness and costs of healthcare delivery.  However, we wanted to put this in a larger context.  […]

Patterns of Change

Invention or ideas lead to innovation and change, often championed by someone other than the originator – think of Carnegie, Morgan, Rockefeller and Vanderbilt.  The change agent builds an empire around the innovation, typically aspiring to monopolize the commercial value of the innovation.  The empire becomes exploitive of customers, employees, and the environment.  Eventually, the […]

The Current Communicator

I recently visited the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.  One can question the whole “City on the Hill” imagery, but the Great Communicator was undoubtedly able to evoke a positive emotional response from me three decades after the original narrative. How does this compare to the Current Communicator? Both Presidents inherited troubled economies– one could easily […]

A Small Transformation Experiment

On November 15th of 2010, I began a small experiment.  The lease on my car ended that day, and I just turned the car in and took the bus home.  I decided to see what life would be like without a car. My office is close to a subway stop and there is a bus […]

Collaborative Networks

I am at the IEEE Workshop on the Future of Information at the National Academy of Engineering in Washington, DC.  The purpose of the workshop is to consider how engineers and scientists will access and use information in 2020, including what types and sources of information they will seek and find available. Yesterday was the […]

Valuing the Future

I once asked an Assistant Secretary and Chief Financial Executive of a government agency whether he preferred to be in control of all the budget of his agency or to be in control of how the money was counted.  He responded, “If I can control how the money is counted, I don’t need to control […]

Value of Prevention

Last August, the Director of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), Douglas W. Elmendorf, sent a letter to Congress informing them that most preventative health interventions tend to expand utilization of services with costs that far exceed the eventual cost savings due to avoiding disease or detecting it earlier.  In other words, he reported that prevention […]

Unintended Consequences

Medicare limits reimbursement for healthcare procedures, often below the cost of delivery of these procedures.  Not surprisingly, healthcare providers figure out ways to compensate for these price controls.  They may, for example, bundle other, profitable services with those that they are forced to provide at a loss to get the overall profit margin to be […]

Transforming the Debate

The debate in Washington seems stuck in partisan positioning and sound bites.  We have lost track of the fundamental objectives that need to be pursued.  I think the overarching objective should be quite simple – we want a healthy, educated, and productive population that is competitive in the global marketplace. We do not really want […]