Posts Tagged ‘Renaissance’

Causes of Transformation in Academia

Our graduate seminar on “Transforming Academia” started this week. We focused on the roots of the modern university in the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and The Enlightenment. We debated the interpretation of developments in terms of transformational versus evolutionary changes. Also of central interest were the causes of change. The plague, printing press and paper all […]

Transforming Academia — Reading List

Here are all the suggestions received thus far: Altbach, P.G., Berdahl, R.O., & Gumport, P.J. (Eds.).(2005). American Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century: Social, Political and Economic Challenges. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press. Barke, R. (2000). Sustainable Technology/Development and Challenges to Engineering Education. Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education, St. Louis, MO. […]

Transformation Archetypes — Part 4

A year ago, I bought an iPhone.  About six months ago, I switched from a PC to a Mac.  A few months ago, I began to use texting and now frequently rely on this means of communication.  Now, I am writing a blog.  My colleagues think that I have a chance of actually making it […]

Transformation Archetypes — Part 3

The Renaissance is typically associated with great works of art and architecture.  As noted in Part 2, Filippo Brunelleschi was an early Renaissance artist and architect.  His dome of the Florence Cathedral was a major engineering feat.  Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) was a scientist, engineer, painter, and sculptor, with works ranging from The Last Supper […]

Transformation Archetypes — Part 2

A confluence of forces also led to the Renaissance, the highly creative period between the Middle Ages and the Modern Era that began in Tuscany in Florence in the 14th Century.  The origins of the Renaissance are often traced to the writings of Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) and Francesco Petrarca (1304-1374), and the art of Filippo […]