Posts Tagged ‘Education’

Transforming Public-Private Enterprises: Introduction

It is difficult to transform a large enterprise.  Leaders of many private sector enterprises have told me that their toughest job is managing the enterprise they have while trying to create the enterprise they want.  Not surprisingly, the failure rate is very high, as illustrated by 200% turnover in the Fortune 500 in the past […]

A Tsunami of Talent

I am in Beijing and Shanghai for a few days.  The reason for my being in China is to chair the International Review Board at Tsinghua University where we are reviewing the Department of Industrial Engineering. The basic statistics are chilling.  In the U.S., 4% of undergraduates matriculate in engineering. Of those that graduate, 12% […]

Causes of Transformation in Academia

Our graduate seminar on “Transforming Academia” started this week. We focused on the roots of the modern university in the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and The Enlightenment. We debated the interpretation of developments in terms of transformational versus evolutionary changes. Also of central interest were the causes of change. The plague, printing press and paper all […]

Transforming Academia — Reading List

Here are all the suggestions received thus far: Altbach, P.G., Berdahl, R.O., & Gumport, P.J. (Eds.).(2005). American Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century: Social, Political and Economic Challenges. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press. Barke, R. (2000). Sustainable Technology/Development and Challenges to Engineering Education. Proceedings of the American Society for Engineering Education, St. Louis, MO. […]

Transforming Academia

The first universities in Europe — University of Bologna (1088), University of Oxford (1096), University of Paris (1150), University of Modena (1175) — began as private corporations of teachers and their pupils. Soon they realized they needed protection against local city authorities. They petitioned secular power for privileges and this became the model for academia. […]

People and Organizations

I have worked with well over 100 enterprises and several thousand executives and senior managers, often focused on initiatives that have the potential to fundamentally change their enterprises.  Somewhat simplistically, these initiatives depended on three ingredients – technology, people, and organizations.  Frequently these executives and managers commented that technology was the easy part.  People and […]

Investing in People

I am pleased to report that this week John Wiley released “The Economics of Human Systems Integration: Valuation of Investments in People’s Training and Education, Safety and Health, and Work Productivity.”  I edited this book with contributions from many economists, systems engineers, and behavioral and social scientists.  The overarching question that motivated this book was, […]

Tipping Points

Malcolm Gladwell popularized the notion of a “tipping point,” the point at which something is displaced from a state of equilibrium and evolves, either quickly or slowly, to a new and different state of equilibrium.  For example, my telephone bill used to be something like $20 per month; now it is several hundred.  The capabilities […]

Collaborative Networks

I am at the IEEE Workshop on the Future of Information at the National Academy of Engineering in Washington, DC.  The purpose of the workshop is to consider how engineers and scientists will access and use information in 2020, including what types and sources of information they will seek and find available. Yesterday was the […]

Information and Incentives

In January, I discussed the notion of transforming organizational silos in academia to collaborative networks that can address large-scale research problems.  At the moment, I am sitting in a meeting at the University of Illinois that is, in part, focused on this possibility.  People are discussing the difficulties that they have encountered in pursuing this […]